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parties are. >> they are going with the american economy and the global economy. closer you get to the fiscal cliff, i think the less likely it is that the u.s. will be funded over and. >> okay, let me ask about tax reform. mutual political last week that a balanced approach to placing the sequester with benefits and revenues should accelerate tax reform, and i believe it's fully possible this year we work on a bipartisan basis. how does that square with the people that say that the tax reform is going to lose out because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do in the
to carry out the agenda i campaigned on. new security for the middle class. right now our economy is growing and our businesses are creating new jobs. we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions in sound investments, and as long as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago
of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sensible. we should not be doing this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want t
and spending cuts which could embroil the economy and stock market in a new round of uncertainty but it kicks that can down the road, so is that why stocks are a bit tempered today? we'll take a look at that. the dow right now up 12 points. we are flirting with those five and a half year highs, 13,610 and change would be that five and a half year high so we're just pleau that right now. the nasdaq down another eight points at the moment at 3127 and technology among the groups suffering today. the s&p, again, here we go again. any positive close for the standard & poor's 500 would be another five and a half year high for the s&p. let's take a closer look at the markets in today's closing bell exchange with our guests. andres, you and i were talking about the markets earlier. what do you think? getting ahead of ourselves with the rallies we've had so far this year. >> earnings matter, and we're in earnings season. to a certain extent we might see some consolidation in the short term. if we look at valuations, still looks attractive or trading 13 times future earnings, 12 months ahead. the avera
to disaster: how green jobs are damaging america's economy." in it, she subjects the assumption and policies which led to such a faded federal investments as solyndra solar panel manufacture as was that a 123 collector car battery manufacture to a waiting analysis which we of the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book, she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tales for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication that regulates the disaster caps diane mr. shear as an institute senior fellow, i'll year in which has been prolific and influential. cited by reuters reporters, talk show host, across the country. i think in particular of her many, many contributions to our series called issues 2012, ranging from her analysis demonstrating that even adjusting for the state of the
. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the kru united states of america is not a bargaining chip and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> john boehner put o out a statement right after the news conference trying to stay out of box the president put them in. he said, the house will doity job and pass responsible legislation that droenls spending, meets our nation's obligations and keeps the government running. the question will be, can he move his caucus in a place to where he is reach an agreement with the president that raises the debt limit without violating the president's pledge. he says he will only go for a balanced approach to deficit reduction, meaning tax revenue as well as spending cuts. we're in for a major fight coming up quickly, sue and tyler. looks like we can hit the debt ceiling as early as one month from now. >> john, this is not kinder gently rhetoric, not by a long shot. but who can forget the m
appropriate levers and can drive productivity throughout the entire economy, the two we're focused on are what we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolut
of the issues, regulatory issues and housing was really good today. the economy is feeling better and investors aren't feeling bad. earnings numbers pretty solid so people are voting with their dollars right now. things are positive. >> for how much longer, mike? you have to admit, a pretty good run for a while now. are we due for a pullback of some kind? >> due for a rest or a pullback, would i say, but i don't think it's anything that looks like it has to be too dangerous. in addition to all the things michael is talking about, the market's refusal to go down when everybody else is saying it's overbought, probably contributed to the fact that we have this give up move higher. chatter today that maybe the republicans won't go down to the wire and contest the debt ceiling increase. all these things have swept away a lot of nagging concerns and the next thing to worry about is people don't know exactly what the next thing to worry about s is. >> let's turn it over to you. what are you expecting throughout the rest of this earnings season. we haven't had any major blowoffs, but we're not talking
escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people well-being is not a leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states is not a bargaining chip. they had better choose quickly, because time is running short. the last time republicans in congress even flirted with this idea, r. triple-a credit rating was downgraded for the first time in our mystery, our businesses created the few jobs in any month in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. ho
thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament's in session. you can see this week's question time again sunday night at 9 eastern and pacific on c-span. and or for more information go to and click on c-span se
sensitive to the economy commodity in the world. ip took out a lot of capacity. ip is a genius. this company's had an unmitigated run. capacity's constrained, prices going up, 95% of capacity. that is like -- you can put the price increase after price increase, that says the economy is much stronger than expected. this is the first commodity to raise prices big when things get better. they're raising prices consistently. very bullish. >> that is a great, great tell. still more to come this morning. get ready for an ipo hat trick, sunco energy partners, norwegian cruise lines, all making their debuts this morning. stick around to see how they open for trading. the opening bell is just a few minutes away. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] t
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
talked about politics and about constitution, institutions. we talked about the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's going to happen. nobody knows that he's alive or dead or on life support although we did hear from his brother yesterday that he is not in a coma. we thought he was either in a, or on life support. now we know he is not. other really insightful information we've gotten from the regime or that he's in a stationary situation. i have no idea what that means. that is a stationary situation. >> his treatment was being assimilated. they are still using that, his treatment is being assimilated. so we haven't really had any insight into whether chavez is going to make it or not. the prospects are probably that he is not. w
the gulf we recognize that healthy echo systems also can mean healthy economies. and from louisiana what we have taken, what we believe is a very good first effort in addressing both the vulnerability that exist with the state's master plan has which is is a long-term plan addressing the ecological but reducing the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve a 100-year protection for the community it's the resources that important. the ecological resource that's state provides and the gulf provides to the nation that if it's going to be afforded through the nation it has to provide protection to those communities who provide that. we believe that this plan we can have sustainable long-term healthy echo systems but also healthy communities and economies. there's an essence a form of what we call social engineering. if you can't ensure the communities, the supermarkets, the schools the things that community depend on, they will not survive. we want to make sure that we're developing both a healthy echo logical system but -- we have gone a long way in first attempt. it's not perfect. we h
for our economy. so important for our public safety. so important for emergency response as we witnessed here in the northeast of the country. and so, while the fight was long and at times, unnecessary, at least the vote was taken today and we move forward. mr. garamendi: thank you, mr. tonko. the bill now is out of this house. it's already in the senate. we expect the senate to pass it probably tomorrow or the next day. certainly before the inaugural on monday and then the president will sign it shortly thereafter. bringing that kind of relief. you mentioned the jobs issue and people need to go to work. when we have these natural disasters and we come forward with the kind of support that we have seen today and will soon be available for new jersey, new york, connecticut and the surrounding areas, people go back to work. those people that have received immediate fema support for housing, for clothing, for food, that money is immediately spent into the economy. on the infrastructure side, it's crucial when the subways of lower manhattan flooded, the world's financial institution took a w
the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desireable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. good judgment seeks balance in progress, lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration. >> words of president eisenhower 52 years ago. are those words relevant today as he talked about what government can and cannot do in solving problems. that speech is still available online. and pointing out those remarks giving the country a dire warning about what he described as a threat to democratic government. he also used the phrase military industrial complex. since then that has become a rallying cry of opponents for expansion. in an effort to control the expansion of the military industrial complex the president sought to cut the pentagon's budget. he wanted a budget he said the country could afford. share your thoughts about the role you t
of its politics and economics and society, mexico has the 13th largest economy in the world today. $1.16 trillion. the oecd predicts in 2042, when regeneration, mexico will have his archer economy than germany's. this is not me. this is the oecd project enough things being equal. therefore notwithstanding the inequality that exists in mexico that has to be dealt with and will be dealt with over time, the fact of the matter is that texaco socially is becoming more and more middle-class society and that is reflect to and every one of the usual measures. demographically, lifestyle, in terms of fertility rate, number of students in university, quality of the housing. all of these trends have brought mexico to the point where it is becoming predominately of middle-class society and will continue to move in that direction. and third, mexico lyrically speaking is a functioning democracy. not perfect, nor is our democracy perfect. but when you look at their electoral system, if you look at the way in which freedom of the press has been moved into mexico with passion, he began to see the devel
or markets could go haywire causing a self-inflicted wound to the economy. is he exaggerating? what's the take on the remarks in reaction how the debt ceiling sorts itself out? >> i don't think he's exaggerating at all. we have these debates every year right now, and we have the better part of the last 20 years, but it seems like when it comes to the wire, we always find a way to raise the debt ceiling, get washington back to work again, and that is our expectation. the difficulty is that the uncertainty in washington is freezing the treasury mark and investors. >> okay. back to ben bernanke, commenting this afternoon, if he reassures wall street he plans to continue the bond buying for as long as it needs to happen to get unemployment back, to get the economy growing. do you think that will keep rates depressed or signals, yeah, you know, we don't need to continue with this as long as we had initially planned to. do you expect a sharp, a rise in rates in take it from there. curious to where you think rates are headed. >> lori, between now and the date of sequesteringen on march 1st
on immigration? it is not the only topic on the mayor's agenda. he is been discussing gun control, the economy and many other matters. some have taken notice of his travel to latin america, and some are asking whether a position in the obama administration will be part of his future. please join me in the coming to the national press club, the mayor of los angeles, antonio villaraigosa. [applause] >> thank you, thersa for that introduction, and for inviting me here today at the national press club. before i start, i grew up in a home where we are used to serving ourselves, so whenever i am served, i like to think our servers. if we could give them a big hand, please. [applause] i want to think particularly the members of the press club for this opportunity to speak to you all today. i am truly honored to be here at one of our country's most venerable institutions of in less than six months my final term as mayor of los angeles will come to a close. with each passing week i take another step toward what one would call the transition from who's who to who's he? the sun may be setting on my admin
the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. martha: hmmm. there you go. iowa republican congressman steve king joins me now. so those are your two options. you can either crash the american economy or you can raise the debt limit or refuse to raise the debt limit. what do you pick, congressman king? >> isn't that masterful political rhetoric coming from the president? if you listen to him talk, there is a little pause in his selection of words there, you it is choreographed and carefully chosen but the american people will be able to see through this i believe. the first problem we need to deal with, martha, the misuse of the term default that emerged in the last debt ceiling crisis in august of 2011 when used on both sides of the aisle, when we reach the point the united states didn't have anymore borrowing authority that automatically meant default. it doesn't. that was a false definition then. it is a false definition now. we have enough money to operate essential components of this government that we can go on for a very long time. this
the showdown is at least six weeks out the president spoke gloomily of an economy. >> the republican in congress have two choices, act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> reporter: house republicans say the issue isn't ransom but preservation. >> the growth of entitlements continues at a rapid pace we have to come to that realization and we have to quit spending money and try to cut into this deficit. >> reporter: house republicans see the debt ceiling deadline next month as one of the best ways early in the president's second term to force him to accept a new round of spending cuts and may have it on an incremental basis, one, two o three months and using that process to achieve more deficit reduction. >> former speaker of the house and republican presidential candidate newt gingrich. good morning mr. speaker. >> it's good to be with you. >> good to be with you. you say fighting over the debt
the economy in great detail. he does massive preparation and i think when he sits down at a table to say, do a fiscal deal one of the reasons he's able to close that deal is because, a, he has decades of experience in compromise which some of these kids today up there don't really know much about. and he understands the granularity of these issues and we saw this and it's helpful. >> vice president joe biden is going to take the oath of office for a second tomorrow right after we return from the break. ♪ ♪ pop goes the world pop in a whole new kind of clean with tide pods. a powerful 3-in-1 detergent that cleans, brightens and fights stains. pop in. stand out. but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and err
that the slaves produced for their masters and that made up the core of the southern economy. and only slave labor, only the labor of people who were owned outright by their owners, by landowners who had no right to object, much less to refuse the conditions under which they were compelled to work, only slave labor would cultivate those crops intensively and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. slavery's importance to the southern elite was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be an essential, even an irreplaceable fixture of society. it was inseparable from everything that they knew and loved. it was inseparable from all aspects of what they refer to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, the assumptions, the norms, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply and reflectsively attached -- reflectsively attached. it defined their culture, it shaped their religion, it even sh
to become the sole provider in a time when mexico was going through rough times, you any, their economy in the toilet, the national debt crisis had devastated the economy in mexico, and my mother came back to be a single mother of father without my father's support so she changed a lot, and she, you know, she was bitter about the whole experience in the u.s., and she was broken hearted, and i think in many ways, we paid the price for what my father did to her because she was no longer interested in being our mother. you know, she was interested in finding someone else to could protect her, who could take care of herring and who, i guess, repair the damage, you know, that my father had done. this is what happened to my mother, and i understand that in many ways, and back then, obviously, i didn't because i was the daughter seeing her mother drift from her mother and more each day. >> host: reyna, you mentioned you got the green card and ran with it. where did you go to school? where did you study? >> how did you become an award winning novelist and now in non-fiction? >> guest: when i go
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have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
. >> the recovering the economy and high gas prices are driving record riders ship on bart. >> but the increase in passengers could bring problems as the transit district does not act to increase its capacity and rejuvenate its aging infrastructure. >> bart riders it has increased 6% over last year of the agency only anticipated a rise of about 2%. >> bart officials say to handle growth without dismissing service it needs to, the agency needs to beef up orders new train cars and increase capacity of platforms at the busiest bart stations. >> many of the times by a $18 million over budget and the first year mayor ed lease administration. >> officials say overtime work more than double the salary of some in the employes, with one muni mechanic raking in an extra $160,000. >> employees say a lot of the overtime and for working to get many new train control system operating. >> overall, many as 22 of the city's top 25 overtime wage earners, far outpacing the usual leaders to work in police and fire. >> we now know, the lance the falcons will face off against the san francisco 49ers next sunday. >>
that the global economy will grow by 3% this year. the revised figure is 2% to 4%. officials largely blame the u.s. and europe for the drop. they said political squabbling over the fiscal glif and the upcoming debt ceiling debate pose big risks to the worldwide economy. the ongoing recession in the euro zone also a factor. >>> and winter weather prompts a state of emergency. salt trucks ran all night long to prevent sleet and freezing rain from the roadways and almost a quarter inch of ice formed on power lines and heavy rain is now causing flooding. >>> facebook's new search tool is surrounded by hype, but others think it might be a dude. it's called graph search and it's a way to search through your facebook network for answers. information google cannot access. you could look for restaurants your friends like, kind of like yelp or look for job connections like on linked-in or you can use it to find singles in your area. steven levy is the senior writer for "wired" magazine. steven, welcome. >> thank you. >> okay, you went to the facebook campus, experimenting with graph search. you interviewe
is a bundle of joy for california's economy. a future worker. a future taxpayer, and a future buyer for your home. trouble is, there aren't enough women having babies. that spells potential crisis for the future of the state. >> i want to get married, have a career, all these things. most of my friends feel the same way. i think our generation wants to wait longer. we don't really see ourselves with kids in our 20s. >> maybe it's the economy. people with making sure they have enough for themselves first. >> we peaked in california in 1990. >> reporter: dell myers from usc sees a convergence of troubling trends. on top of a declining birthrate, there is a growing senior population. that means a shortage of doctors and caregivers in the supply pipeline to serve the aging. >> basically, there's almost twice as many seniors now per working-age person, or there will will, than tha there have been traditionally. >> reporter: aggravating factors are declining education opportunities and a higher cost of living in california. fewer people are coming to the state, including undocumented workers. myer
that? is there enough tax generated in the economy to offset that? and would disaster occurs are you on the hook for off infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and asia return on that exposure -- is your return greater? as a taxpayer, the answer is unfortunately too often know. we have subsidize risks to the point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs, you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessary generating revenue or other societal benefits off that risk. now, during the '70s and '80s and through the early '90s, went a lot of growth was taking place in coastal areas and other vulnerable areas, very few storms were occurring. frequency was down. so the allusion was i have lived here for 30 years, this never happens. welcome the problem with climate whether it's 30 year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how big systems and dynamics work. not talking at any of the forcing issues, and now we find ourselves in this period of increased activity and you are sitting on t
immigration reform in the first year, that's before the economy was on the verge of collapse. lehman brothers had collapsed. the stock market was collapsing. and so my first priority was making sure we prevented us from going into a great depression. and i think everybody remembers where we were four years ago. what i confess i did not expect, and so i'm happy to take responsibility for being naive here, is that republicans who had previously supported comprehensive immigration reform -- my opponent in 2008 who had been a champion of it and who attended these meetings -- suddenly would walk away. >> president obama's comments come as his administration faces scrutiny for deporting and detaining a record number of undocumented people. nearly 400,000 immigrants were deported during the last fiscal year. republican presidential nominee mitt romney also fielded questions about immigration during a wednesday appearance on univision. romney attacked obama is deferred action policy that allows some young undocumented people to remain in the country temporarily, saying a more permanent solution was n
are encouraged that there are signs that congressional republicans on holding our economy hostage to extract drastic cuts in medicare that middle class families depend on. it was positive from the white house. pretty negative response from nancy pelosi, the democratic leader in the house. this pros poll sas, she says, does not relieve the uncertainty faced by the middle class. this is a gimmick unworthy of the challenges we face and the national debate we should be having. the message for the american people is clear, no gauges, no default. is there a lack of coordination in the response between pelosi and the white house? >> look, i think both sides are true. it's positive that the republicans and the congress are backing off of that threat. it's also true that we can't go in three-month increments having a debate about whether we're going to pay our bills and whether we're going to jeopardize the full faith and credit of the united states of america. we need to work this through, find a long-term solution for this and bring some certainty to the economy. >> i'm not sure i'd say it's an ent
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to afghanistan, will be beneficial to the afghan people and will not have adverse effects on afghan economy and the prosperities that we have gained. in the past many years. we also discussed the issue of election in afghanistan and the importance of elections for the afghan people with the hope that we'll be conducting a free and fair election in afghanistan where our friends in the international community and particularly the united states will be assisting in conducting those elections. of course. where afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the b
" exploring what makes economies breakout or break down. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern live on c-span. >> now a discussion about legalizing marijuana and federal state relations. colorado and washington state recently legalized the recreation nal use of marijuana but it continues to be illegal under federal law. this brookings event is just over an hour and a half. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> welcome, everybody. thank you very much for coming. my name is jonathan roush. i'm a guest scholar in governance studies here at brookings. it's very good of you to come on a cold day when so much else is going on in washington. some of you may have heard the two states that legalized marijuana. the news may have trickled out that washington and colorado did this in november. there has been some discussion of the drug policy implication. but today we're going to try to put your heads and ours in a different space and try to think about the power implications of this. i'm a fan of short intro ducks, t
. and then the president says he's not negotiating on the debt ceiling. what does that mean for our economy? senator rob portman says he's got an idea and alternative. that senator up next. here he comes. >>gretchen: welcome back. how big of a threat is our national debt? one theme from the hbo film "too big to fail" spells out the risks pretty clearly. watch it. >> the threats from russia, they suggest we coordinate and without warning dump hundreds of billions of if fannie's and freddie's bonds on to the market. the amount of debt your country carries is a terrible vulnerability. >>gretchen: a terrible vulnerability. senator rob portman couldn't agree more. he's a member of the senate finance committee and former budget director for george w. bush. good morning to you, senator. when we hear this vulnerability, you agree with that; right? >> absolutely. the president yesterday said we need to raise the debt limit because we have to pay our bills. we're at historic levels, $130,000 per family right now, over $16.5 trillion. yes, we need to raise the debt limit at some point but we have to do it in the c
. the 2013 ram 1500 with best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >> welcome back. we're coming to you this morning live from newtown, connecticut. today marks one month since the tragic shootings that took so many young lives and so many lives overall. vice president joe biden is going to be meeting with the house of representatives, and finalize the recommendations that he'll give based on meetings that he has had with his gun task force and groups across the country. he is expected to recommend a couple of things. universal background checks and limiting high capacity magazines as well as encouraging more research into links between violent media and gun violence. >> first of all, it's sobering to be in this place here at this time. i just want to say that. i think the president is going to be more aggressive here in his second term on this. i mean, gun control is an issue that divides the country very closely. i think almost exactly in half. the reality is that the half of the country that
of his are not just reforming immigration in a way that meets the needs of our modern economy, desolate awakened system of values in recent times, but reimagining the border not a sin and place, but a place that facilitates, and it's in the middle come in at the end. we joked in a previous event that we need a different word. the word order does it represent what this thing is between our two countries. it's not an end stuff. the place of incredibly tvd and part of the problem is we have an infrastructure that's as old as those sold bridges that we need to modernize and give tools for countries to take advantage of the incredible economic opportunity to ensue in the next generation. free final data points. one, crime on the u.s. side, one of the things alan said is how much her strategies for. i'll pass that was the safest, largest city. i've been getting this wrong on tv. safest large city across from a city that is not so safe. second is the net migration between the united states and mexico of undocumented immigrants has gone to zero. we now have the demographic changes, sine complet
of the created conglomeration of the economy looks like for those and students here at the school of public health taught me about these opportunities to quantify attitudes towards conflict and aggression and we were able to show with a fall of 28 days surveys before and after the intervention that there was a short term improvement in those attitudes and that is in my talking and academic arena prevention outreach added to the conflict and aggression, 98 kids cross 13 months and then i was invited to go to new york. mayor bloomberg isn't here but mtv executives invited me to a video that had an antiviolence fema and i said that interests me let me see that. well, this was about eight years ago. my 15 year old was then 7-years-old but i didn't know much about 50-cent, the rapper that had this ongoing dual with jarule come and 50 have more credibility why? i told the story 150 times and shot nine times he has more credibility. but does that say about our culture of violence? taking credit by the way being shot nine times. [applause] the video that i salles enrage me to it was the same cultur
and weak economies. back to you. >> mary thompson of the new york stock exchange. thank you. what is more incredible than a spectator at a basketball game sinking a half-court shot? check out what happened when atlanta hawk fan kevin went for the thousand dollar prize at half time. as you see, the ball got wedged there right between the backboard and the rim. kevin, though, did win the thousand dollars because the shot was so unbelievable, and technically the ball did make it into the basket when a hawk staffer then yanked on the net. >> go back to the beginning of that. technically, savannah just pointed out he shouldn't have gotten the money because he stepped over the line at half-court. watch closely. there, right there. i would have given it to him, savannah. >> i think we all know that i would have given it to him. just for showing up, i would have given him the thousand bucks. let's get to dylan dryer who is in for al. what a mess on the east coast this morning. >> such a mess. commuters dealing with rain, ice, sleet. we have snow across new england. it is going to be messy through
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